Awards

We are pleased to present the N&G Abstract Awards. The N&G award recognizes young physicians for their work in two categories; Neonatology/Infancy and Obesity. This year, the awards are supported by an educational grant from the Nestlé Nutrition Institute for the best abstracts submitted to 6th International Conference on Nutrition & Growth.

The award recipients, selected by the N&G scientific committee,  will be presented at the N&G 2019 conference in Valencia, Spain during the Opening Ceremony on Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 14:30. Each abstract will receive a 5,000 prize.

Join us in congratulating the winners: 


the obesity best n&g research award

Obesity

WINNER: Dr. Nanna Julie Olsen 

Abstract entitledPRIMARY PREVENTION OF FAT AND WEIGHT GAIN AMONG OBESITY SUSCEPTIBLE NORMAL WEIGHT PRESCHOOL CHILDREN. RESULTS FROM THE "HEALTHY START" RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED INTERVENTION

Successful treatment of obesity is well documented among children. The real public health challenge lies in understanding the primary drivers behind excessive weight gain among normal weight individuals. The aim of this primary prevention RCT was to examine if excessive weight and fat gain can be prevented among normal weight, but obesity susceptible, young children aged 2-6 years. We found that this primary prevention intervention (improvement in diet and physical activity habits, optimization of sleep quantity and quality and reduction of stress in the family), conducted among young normal weight children with a susceptibility to future obesity, suggested improved growth and body composition after 15 months intervention, especially among the youngest children.

 Introduction:

Nanna Olsen.jpgDr. Nanna Julie Olsen received her Master of Public Health degree in 2007, and her PhD degree in Public Health and Epidemiology in 2015 from the University of Copenhagen. Dr. Olsen started her career working with intake of soft drinks in relation to obesity in children, and other health outcomes. During her PhD study, she took part in the development of the Healthy Start intervention which was the first ever primary weight gain prevention among normal weight young children. The primary prevention intervention aimed at preventing excessive weight gain by, in addition to improving the children's diet and exercise also focused on better sleep and stress management. She is the daily coordinator of the Healthy Start intervention and is currently working on a new project to study the effects of stress management among pregnant women on growth in the offspring. 

Affiliation

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Research Unit for Dietary Studies at the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark

 


the infancy best n&g research award

Infancy

WINNER: Dr. Brittany Rollins Howell

Abstract entitledDEVELOPMENT OF THE MICROBIOME OVER THE FIRST THREE YEARS OF LIFE IN THE BABY CONNECTOME PROJECT - ASSOCIATIONS WITH FEEDING PRACTICE

The gut microbiome is established and undergoes rapid changes early in life. Breastmilk is a potent modulator of the gut microbiota. The Baby Connectome Project (BCP) and BCP-Enriched utilize an accelerated longitudinal design to assess early feeding practice related changes in the composition of the gut microbiome in typically developing infants. The Results replicate previous work where early microbiota are dominated by Bifidobacteria, which decrease in abundance beginning around 4-5 months of age (coincident with the introduction of solid food). Bacteroidaceae and others became the dominant families from five to eighteen months. The clustering analysis found five clusters that appear to be related to age (Fig 1B). Our preliminary analyses suggest that differences in Bifidobacteria based on feeding practice may exist early on, but appear to normalize.

 Introduction:

HowellBrittany.jpg

Dr. Howell earned her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Emory University, Atlanta, Ga., in 2013 after having earned her B.S. in Cell and Molecular Biology and Neuroscience in 2006 from Tulane University, New Orleans, La. She worked under the guidance of Dr. Mar Sanchez at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, where her dissertation focused on determining the effects of infant maltreatment on neurodevelopment and how these alterations are related to psychopathology in rhesus monkeys. She applied in vivo imaging techniques to follow structural changes in the brains of rhesus macaques with histories of maternal physical abuse and neglect longitudinally, from birth through the juvenile period. Her current work as a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Jed Elison's group at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, combines her expertise in neuroimaging with biological samples collected as part of the UNC/UMN Baby Connectome Project to better understand the biological pathways through which mothers modulate brain development in their babies. These pathways include bioactive constituents of breast milk and effects on the fecal microbiome. The ultimate goal of her research is to inform effective best practices in early care to optimize neurodevelopmental outcomes in all infants. 

 Affiliation 

Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  



Keep Me Updated